July 24, 2008


NEW MANSIONS FOR MUSICPerformance, Pedagogy and Criticism
Lakshmi Subramanian

182 pages 215x140 mm Hardback 8 illustrations
Social Science Press-Orient Longman Joint publication
Rs 425
ISBN 978-81-87358-34-3
MUSIC, HISTORY, CULTURE STUDIES, SOCIOLOGY
Pub Date July 2008



THE ESSAYS in New Mansions for Music: Performance, Pedagogy and Criticism look at one of the most ancient and rigorous classical musical traditions of India, the Karnatik music system, and the kind of changes it underwent once it was relocated from traditional spaces of temples and salons to the public domain. Nineteenth-century Madras led the way in the transformation that Karnatik music underwent as it encountered the forces of modernization and standardization. This study also contributes to our understanding of the experience of modernity in India through the prism of music. The role of Madras city as patron and custodian of the performing arts, especially classical music offers an invaluable perspective on the larger processes of modernization in India.

In an immensely readable book peppered with anecdotes and conversations with leading musicians and critics of the day, as well as humorous visual representations, part caricature, part satirical, the author describes a rapidly changing society and its new look in early-twentieth-century Madras.
Contents:Introduction
Chapter 1: The Katcheri: Living Laboratory or Enchanted Space
Chapter 2: Articulating an Aesthetic: The Emergence of the Music Critic in Modern South India
Chapter 3: From the Gurukula to the University: Initiatives in Music Education
Chapter 4: The Lighter Side of Entertainment
On the History of Music: A Bibliographical Essay
Glossary
Index


Lakshmi Subramanian is Professor, Department of History and Culture, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi. Her earlier publications include From the Tanjore Court to the Madras Music Academy: A Social History of Music in South India, O.U.P, Delhi, 2006.

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